Meet MGA Students


The Keough School’s master of global affairs program, a two-year program, includes 74 students.  Current students and MGA alumni represent more than 50 countries including:

Afghanistan; Argentina; Bangladesh; Belarus; Belize; Burkina Faso; Canada; Chile; China; Colombia; Costa Rica; Democratic Republic of Congo; Ecuador; Egypt; El Salvador; Ethiopia; The Gambia; Ghana; Haiti; Honduras; Hungary; Indonesia; Iran; Japan; Kazakhstan; Kenya; Lebanon; Mali; Mexico; Mongolia; Morocco; Nepal; Nigeria; Pakistan; Palestine; Peru; the Philippines; Russia; Sierra Leone; South Africa; South Korea; Tajikistan; Trinidad and Tobago; Turkey; Ukraine; Uganda; the United Kingdom; the United States; Uzbekistan; Vietnam; and Zimbabwe.

The students bring a wealth of professional experience in international development, education, peacebuilding, environmental conservation, human rights, humanitarian assistance, journalism, and other fields. All students in the class have received fellowships thanks to a number of generous families, as well as foundation support and funding from institutes and the University more widely.



Asinamai Ndai

Asinamai Ndai

Sustainable Development, 2021

Nigeria

Asinamai Ndai has devoted his professional life to supporting health systems in northeast Nigeria. He recently worked for the USAID Global Health Supply Chain Program, an organization that works with the government to ensure that the supply chain of life-saving health commodities runs efficiently. He was one of the pioneers of a mobile ART (antiretroviral therapy) clinic initiative in camps for internally displaced persons, which ensures that hundreds of HIV-positive persons can access life-saving antiretroviral medications while living in the camps. Asinamai holds a bachelor of pharmacy degree and master’s degrees in health planning & management and disaster risk management from the University of Maiduguri. As a student, Asinamai was the recipient of a Riberas Orjales Family Fellowship.

Feature: Master of global affairs student helps health officials forecast PPE needs