Meet MGA Students


Current students and alumni from the master of global affairs program in the Keough School of Global Affairs represent more than 60 countries including:

Afghanistan; Argentina; Bangladesh; Belarus; Belize; Botswana; Burkina Faso; Canada; Chile; China; Colombia; Costa Rica; Democratic Republic of Congo; Ecuador; Egypt; El Salvador; Ethiopia; Finland; The Gambia; Ghana; Guatemala; Haiti; Honduras; Hungary; India; Indonesia; Iran; Japan; Kazakhstan; Kenya; Kyrgyzstan; Lebanon; Mali; Mexico; Moldova; Mongolia; Morocco; Myanmar; Nepal; Nicaragua; Nigeria; Pakistan; Palestine; Peru; the Philippines; Russia; Sierra Leone; Singapore; South Africa; South Korea; Syria; Taiwan; Tajikistan; Trinidad and Tobago; Tunisia; Turkey; Ukraine; Uganda; the United Kingdom; the United States; Uzbekistan; Venezuela; Vietnam; Yemen; and Zimbabwe.

Our students bring a wealth of professional experience in international development, education, peacebuilding, environmental conservation, human rights, humanitarian assistance, journalism, and other fields. All students in the class have received fellowships thanks to a number of generous families, as well as foundation support and funding from institutes and the university more widely.



Ahmed Makki

Ahmed Makki

Sustainable Development, 2020

Pakistan

Ahmed Makki came to the Keough School with seven years of experience working in global development, focusing on education reform. In Pakistan, he worked with a leading consulting firm and global education experts to develop tailored solutions for more than 50,000 public primary schools in Punjab. Specifically, Ahmed designed and implemented one of the world’s largest tablet-based assessment systems for measuring learning outcomes in primary school children. Ahmed also has worked in the rule of law sector, focusing on the improvement of court case management and police data collection systems. As a master of global affairs student, he was the recipient of a Kellogg Institute Fellowship.

Profile: MGA student brings Muslim perspective to refugee aid research in Uganda