Meet MGA Students


The Keough School’s master of global affairs program includes 70 students from 30 countries:

Afghanistan, Argentina, Bangladesh, Belarus, China, Colombia, Costa Rica, Democratic Republic of Congo, Egypt, Ethiopia, Ghana, Honduras, Indonesia, Iran, Japan, Kazakhstan, Kenya, Mexico, Mongolia, Nepal, Nigeria, Pakistan, the Philippines, Russia, Turkey, Ukraine, Uganda, the United States, Uzbekistan and Vietnam.

The students bring a wealth of professional experience in international development, education, peacebuilding, environmental conservation, human rights, humanitarian assistance, journalism, and other fields. All students in the class have received fellowships thanks to a number of generous families, as well as foundation support and funding from institutes and the University more widely.



<strong>Mohammad Omar Metwally</strong>

Mohammad Omar Metwally

International Peace Studies, 2019

Egypt

Mohammad Omar Metwally is a co-founder of multiple youth-led initiatives. Most recently, he worked as a regional coordinator for the Middle East and North Africa Common Ground Institute program at Search for Common Ground. He has nearly a decade of experience designing, implementing, and managing youth programs, with extensive experience in conflict prevention and conflict transformation, research development, and community dialogue design. He holds a bachelor of science degree in biotechnology from Cairo University. Omark also is a Fulbright Scholar.

<strong>Mian Moaz</strong>

Mian Moaz

Sustainable Development, 2019

Pakistan

Mian Moaz has mentored young people in Pakistan by designing wilderness-based leadership development programs as a member of Youth Impact. He speaks Urdu, the national language of Pakistan, and Pushto, the indigenous language of Pathans in the northern region. Most recently, he helped develop an afternoon school for the street children of Peshawar, his native city. He holds a B.S. in economics from the National University of Sciences & Technology. Mian is the recipient of a Donald & Marilyn Keough Fellowship.

Bisharo Ali Mohamed

Bisharo Ali Mohamed

International Peace Studies, 2021

Kenya

Bisharo, a clinical psychologist, holds a master’s degree in clinical psychology from the United States International University-Africa. She also has several years of professional experience in democracy-building and policymaking. Before coming to the Keough School, Bisharo was a consultant at the Green String Network, a nonprofit organization that brings together professionals and experts in peacebuilding, trauma healing, and sustainable economic development. She also has worked with mental health patients at Mathari Hospital, one of the largest hospitals in Nairobi. Bisharo is the recipient of a Kroc Institute Fellowship.

Samuel Morris

Samuel Morris

Sustainable Development, 2021

United States

Samuel Morris served as a Peace Corps volunteer in rural Armenia, where he collaborated with local schools and nongovernmental organizations to improve education and youth development programs. Prior to his Peace Corps service, he worked as an AmeriCorps volunteer coordinating environmental science education efforts between the Project WET Foundation and the Nature Conservancy in Phoenix, Arizona. Samuel also has interned at the United Nations, working with the NGO Committee on Disarmament, Peace, and Security. He holds a BA in political science and a minor in Persian from the University of Arizona. He is the recipient of a Paul D. Coverdell Fellowship.

<strong>Loyce Mrewa</strong>

Loyce Mrewa

International Peace Studies, 2019

Zimbabwe

Loyce Mrewa has worked as a researcher for legal and multidisciplinary research institutes, analyzing issues related to children, persons with disabilities, and constitutional and human rights law. She has published work focusing on international humanitarian law, women’s rights, and children’s rights. She speaks Shona, an official language of Zimbabwe, and is learning French. She holds L.L.B. and L.L.M. degrees with a specialization in international law. Loyce is the recipient of a Thomas D. McCloskey Peace Fellowship.

 

<strong>Parusha Naidoo</strong>

Parusha Naidoo

International Peace Studies, 2019

South Africa

Parusha Naidoo has worked as a researcher for the Human Sciences Research Council and has interned at the Institute for Justice and Reconciliation in Cape Town, South Africa. She holds a bachelor’s degree in economics, international relations, and media studies, and an honors degree in justice and transformation from the University of Cape Town. Through the Restitution Foundation, she recently developed a series of youth dialogues among young South Africans, focusing on justice, equality, and restitution. Parusha is the recipient of a Thomas D. McCloskey Fellowship.

Mathilda Nassar   

Mathilda Nassar  

International Peace Studies, 2021

United States

Mathilda was born and raised in Bethlehem, Palestine. Since graduating from Roanoke College with a BA in international relations, she has served in several peacebuilding capacities. In Palestine she worked for Tent of Nations, a grassroots peace project that strengthens intercultural relationships between Palestinians and visitors from around the world. She later served as a Peace Corps volunteer in Ukraine, where she taught English, coordinated summer camps, and wrote and implemented a USAID grant for community trainings on resume writing, public speaking, and project design and management. Mathilda, who speaks Arabic and Ukrainian, is the recipient of a Kroc Institute Fellowship.

Hugo Flores Navarro

Hugo Flores Navarro

Global Affairs + Specialization, 2021

Mexico

Hugo Flores, a physician, is a graduate of the Tec de Monterrey Medical School. He is a co-founder and former executive director of the Mexican branch of Partners In Health, a nonprofit that provides health services in marginalized areas. His interests include the promotion of health as a human right and the education of young professionals in social medicine. Hugo has collaborated with academic institutions in Mexico and the U.S. and has worked with the Mexican government to implement programs in primary care, mental health, women’s health, chronic diseases, and surgery. His guiding principle—a preferential option for the poor—stems from liberation theology. Before coming to Notre Dame, Hugo is an instructor at Harvard Medical School and an associate physician at Brigham and Women’s Hospital in Boston. He is the recipient of a Paul & Regina Rogalski Global Affairs Fellowship.


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